Thursday, 25 December 2008

Sir Paul McCartney Mobbed By Fans At Album Signing

The Beatle was at the flagship HMV Store on Oxford Street to promote his new album 'Electric Arguments' under his guise The Fireman.

However, when the 66-year-old's car pulled up outside he was besieged by fans eager to get his autograph in a scene reminiscent of The Beatles in the sixties. Once security bundled him inside McCartney explained why he still enjoys record signings, saying: "The main thing is to actually meet the people who buy your records and you get some amazing stories. You're doing a signing and then someone says 'I have just flown in from New York'. She drove from Philadelphia. That is why I do it."

Speaking about making the album with producer Youth, he admitted that the pair just made things up as the went along. He told the Press Association: "This one started to have lyrics and vocals and therefore it developed more as an album. It became more like one of my albums so this is why I'm doing a bit of promotion on this. It's great fun to make. We just made it up as we went along.

"We went in with no songs, no words, nothing, and came out later that day with a whole track. It was a buzz to work so fast. We did about 13 tracks in 13 days. There was no time to think, which is kind of nice."

Drunk Lennon recording grabs $30K at auction

LOS ANGELES, California (CNN) -- Maybe it wasn't John Lennon's best musical effort, but a tape of an apparently inebriated Lennon warbling a cover of Lloyd Price's "Just Because" brought a sobering $30,000 at auction Sunday in Los Angeles.

Bonhams and Butterfields auction house spokeswoman Margaret Barrett said Lennon had apparently had one too many when he got behind the mic in the 1973 recording session. "It was six minutes, 16 seconds, and John singing very drunk and with John ad-libbing his own lyrics into the song -- so it's actually a fun song to listen to," Barrett said.

Described in the auction catalogue as "One standard orange-colored cassette tape with audio of Lennon in fall of 1973 singing the Lloyd Price song 'Just Because,' " the never-before-heard-in-public cassette was given to the former owner personally by Lennon, the auction house said. That former owner was not identified, nor was Sunday's buyer -- for whom another Fab Four classic -- "Money" -- now might have new meaning.

Monday, 22 December 2008

Sir Paul McCartney Mobbed By Fans At Album Signing

The Beatle was at the flagship HMV Store on Oxford Street to promote his new album 'Electric Arguments' under his guise The Fireman.

However, when the 66-year-old's car pulled up outside he was besieged by fans eager to get his autograph in a scene reminiscent of The Beatles in the sixties. Once security bundled him inside McCartney explained why he still enjoys record signings, saying: "The main thing is to actually meet the people who buy your records and you get some amazing stories. You're doing a signing and then someone says 'I have just flown in from New York'. She drove from Philadelphia. That is why I do it."

Speaking about making the album with producer Youth, he admitted that the pair just made things up as the went along. He told the Press Association: "This one started to have lyrics and vocals and therefore it developed more as an album. It became more like one of my albums so this is why I'm doing a bit of promotion on this. It's great fun to make. We just made it up as we went along.

"We went in with no songs, no words, nothing, and came out later that day with a whole track. It was a buzz to work so fast. We did about 13 tracks in 13 days. There was no time to think, which is kind of nice."

Friday, 19 December 2008

Sir Paul McCartney to sign copies of his new Fireman album at HMV on Oxford Street

Beatle down to Oxford Street in London on Sunday 'cos Sir Paul McCartney will be signing copies of his new Fireman album at HMV between 10am to 11am.

Sunday, 14 December 2008

Welshman changed the Beatles, says McCartney

JOHN LENNON has long been credited with giving the Beatles their firebrand political edge through such classics as Revolution and Give Peace A Chance.
But in a challenge to the prevailing view, Sir Paul McCartney has now thanked a renowned Welsh philosopher for changing the band’s musical direction in a move that forever altered the history of pop. The songwriting legend says his eyes were opened to the tumultuous political scene of the late 1960s following a meeting with Monmouthshire-born Bertrand Russell.

Speaking of the band’s eventual change of direction from loveable mop-tops to rock revolutionaries, McCartney said: “We sort of stumbled into things. “For instance, Vietnam. Just when we were getting to be well known, someone said to me: ‘Bertrand Russell is living not far from here in Chelsea, why don’t you go and see him?’ and so I just took a taxi down there and knocked on the door. “He was fabulous. He told me about the Vietnam war — most of us didn’t know about it, it wasn’t yet in the papers — and also that it was a very bad war.

“I remember going back to the studio either that evening or the next day and telling the guys, particularly John, about this meeting and saying what a bad war this was.” McCartney’s interview with intellectual journal Prospect magazine, to be published this week, has already sparked controversy for suggesting it was himself rather than Lennon who politicised the band, as a direct result of his meeting with Russell. The philosopher, from Trellech, near Monmouth, is one of the 20th century’s most revered philosophers, who went to jail for his pacifism during World War I.

Before his death in 1970 aged 97 he was also a supporter of free-trade and a vocal critic of imperialism, Hitler and the Soviet Union. His seminal work A History of Western Philosophy and writings on humanitarianism and freedom of thought saw him win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. McCartney also detailed how the band had spoken out against Vietnam during a tour of the US, and that the “political megaphone” has since been passed on to the likes of Bono and Bob Geldof. He adds: “People often say to me, ‘Do you think music can change the world?’ and I do, on a lot of levels, and one of those levels is just the fact that famous musicians are listened to.
“Perhaps in terms of responsibility we did sow some seeds for people who came after. People like [Bob] Geldof, Bono, people who have the (political) megaphone now.”

However Alan Clayson, who has written separate biographies of all four Beatles, took issue with McCartney’s claims. Much of the band’s later political work like Revolution was written by Lennon – and though Give Peace A Chance was credited to Lennon/McCartney, it was widely seen as essentially a solo effort from John. Mr Clayson said: “I think Sir Paul is rewriting history, now that Lennon is gone.”

Steven Howard, lead singer with Liverpool tribute act the Mersey Beatles, said the band’s members had a massive influence on each other and Paul’s claims may have some credence.
But he said the first political song was penned by neither Lennon nor McCartney, but George Harrison. The guitarist’s Taxman was an attack on the then Labour Prime Minister Harold Wilson’s introduction of a 95% tax bracket for the nation’s biggest earners. Mr Howard, from Liverpool, said: “All four of them, because they were so close and spent so much time together, did have an influence on each other.

“And Lennon may not have written Revolution as a solo artist, but because he had the power of the Beatles he was able to do it. “I think what McCartney’s probably getting at is that he was an enabler – he was the first to have conversations and meetings with people.” But Howard said after the band split in 1970 Lennon’s output became more intensely political than his former collaborator’s, though McCartney did pen Give Ireland Back to the Irish in 1972.

Mr Howard added: “What McCartney did was make his little statements and then go and make some pop records to sell and that was his thing. “Whereas Lennon in the early ’70s got really politicised and just became a voice for groups like Power to the People. “He was even writing records for people who had been jailed unfairly.”